Articles to help you discover the wonders of the Universe

Cosmology

Cosmology is the study of the origin, evolution, structure, dynamics, and ultimate fate of the universe as well as the natural laws that keep it in order. It also includes the study of the nature of the Universe on its very largest scales.

14Mar2018
Steven Hawking, the man with the computerized voice, has become part of pop culture, making his way into TV shows and songs. He has had a prestigious career as a cosmologist who was able to communicate the wonders of the universe despite a progressive and debilitating condition.
Steven Hawking - the Man Behind the Computerized Voice

 

19May2009
Cosmic Scale Factor is a function of time which represents the relative expansion of the universe. It relates the comoving distances for an expanding universe with the distances at a reference time arbitrarily taken to be the present.
Cosmic Scale Factor

 

19May2009
The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) or Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) is the afterglow from the early universe and provides strong evidence for the theory of a hot Big Bang. This article looks at what the CBR is, how it was detected and why it is important for cosmology.
What is the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation?

 

 

16Nov2008
A black hole is a region of space that has so much mass concentrated in a small area that there is no way for a nearby object to escape its gravitational pull.
Black Holes

 

05Nov2008
Attempts to measure the speed of light have played an important part in the development of the theory of special relativity, and, indeed, the speed of light is central to the theory.
The Speed of Light

 

05Oct2008
Physically, light (including X-rays, ultraviolet, visible light, infrared, radio) is an electromagnetic wave and always appears in the form of finite quanta, photons. But what do these terms mean?
The Nature of Light

 

30Sep2008
Despite the complexity of the universe, all matter is made up of a limited number of particles, and the way in which these particles interact with one another can be reduced to no more than four distinct interactions.
The Four Forces in the Universe

 

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