Perfect Astronomy

September Night Sky Astronomy (2022)

Published September 1, 2022 by Tim Trott in News

What to see in the September night sky including Moon phases, September Equinox, planet guide, Jupiter in opposition, star cluster M22 and M28, and Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies M31 and M33.

September Moon Phases

September's full moon is so called the Harvest moon because this is when crops are gathered at the end of the summer season. At this time, the Moon appears particularly bright and rises early, letting farmers continue harvesting into the night.

Full Moon and New Moon for September 2022

Full Moon
Full Moon
Thu 1st Jan
First Quarter
First Quarter
Sun 4th Sep
Last Quarter
Last Quarter
Sun 18th Sep
New Moon
New Moon
Mon 26th Sep

Notable Events in September

September 23rd is the September Equinox. The September equinox occurs at 00:55 UTC. The Sun will shine directly on the equator and there will be nearly equal amounts of day and night throughout the world. This is also the first day of autumn (autumnal equinox) in the Northern Hemisphere and the first day of spring (vernal equinox) in the Southern Hemisphere.

September Planets

Jupiter is a splendid object visible in the southern sky as soon as darkness falls, and on September 26th Jupiter reaches opposition, making it appear its brightest and most illuminated. Using higher magnifications you will see the yellowish flattened disc and as the four Galilean satellites. You should be able to follow the movement of these moons from night-to-night. It will be visible in the mornings from January to May, evenings from May to November, and mornings again from mid-December to the end of December.

Saturn is visible in the mornings from late January to early July, then in the evenings from July to December.

September Meteor Showers

There are no notable meteor showers in September.

September Deep Space Objects

As the warm nights of summer give way to crisp autumnal evenings, there's plenty of autumn deep sky objects to see in the night skies. We take a look at some of the top sights to see during autumn.

M22 is the third brightest star cluster visible in the northern hemisphere and is known to contain at least 75,000 stars. Its low altitude means that it is often overlooked, but at magnitude +5.1, it is a naked eye object and a fine target for small telescopes. It is fairly easy to see in the low southern skies in the constellation of Sagittarius, approximately half way from Nunki to µ Sgr. M28 lies nearby, and although lower again

Location of Globular Cluster M22
Location of Globular Cluster M22

The Andromeda Galaxy (M31) and Triangulum Galaxy (M33) are the real showpieces of the autumnal skies. Both are visible to the naked eye from dark sky sights, and both fine binocular targets. A small telescope will show M31's satellite galaxies M32 and M110, as well as the galaxies dust lanes.

You can find M33 by following the line from the star Mirach to Upsilon Andromedae, and extending it about the same distance in a straight line.

Location of M31 Andromeda Galaxy
Location of M31 Andromeda Galaxy

M33 can be found just less than two-thirds of the way between the stars Hamal in Aries, and Mirach in Andromeda. Through a small telescope, it will appear as a faint, oval shaped patch of light, while larger telescopes should be able to pick out more detail under dark skies.

Finding M33, the Triangulum Galaxy
Finding M33, the Triangulum Galaxy

Comments

There are no comments yet. Why not get the discussion started?